Learning theories – Cognitivism and Connectivism

The contents of this page will build on what I learn about Cognitivism and Connectivism (you may choose one).

On this page, you will refer to one or more of the learning experiences you described in your Personal Learning Experiences page (see above).  You will describe how your personal learning experience was an example or  non-example of Cognitivism or Connectivism (you may choose one).
If your learning experience was an example of instruction or training that was
grounded in Cognitivism or Connectivism (you may choose one), then you
should include specific examples of the instructional strategies and explain
WHY this is an example of Cognitivism or Connectivism.
If your learning experience was not an example of instruction or training that
was grounded in Cognitivism or Connectivism (you may choose one), then
you should include specific examples of the instructional strategies and
explain WHY they were not examples. Also, you should explain how the
instruction or training would have looked if it was grounded in Cognitivism or
Connectivism.
As you discuss Cognitivism or Connectivism (you may choose one), please be
sure you are referring to the literature (APA) to supplement,

 

Additional resources

Cognitive Load Theory, How Do I Apply It? (YouTube video)

Jerome Bruner and the Process of Education (article from infed.org)

Bruner (article from SimplyPsychology)

Self-efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of Behavioral Change (academic article by Albert Bandura, 1977)

The Evolution of Social Cognitive Theory (academic article by Albert Bandura, 2005)

On the Perception of Incongruity: A Paradigm (academic article by Jerome S. Bruner and Leo Postman, 1949)

Value and Need as Organizing Factors in Perception (academic article by Jerome S. Bruner and Cecile C. Goodman, 1947)

A Cognitive Approach to Instructional Design for Multimedia Learning (academic article by Stephen D. Sorden, 2005)

Multimedia Learning (overview from University at Buffalo’s Center for Educational Innovation)

Mayer’s 12 Principles of Multimedia Learning are a Powerful Design Resource (article from emergingedtech.com)